Griffin, Coleman, Greenspan raise money for mentoring

By Lawrence Delevingne

Fri Oct 26, 2012


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The hedge fund industry came out in force to benefit New York City non-profit iMentor.


   
 

iMentor CEO Mike O'Brien addresses the hedge fund heavy crowd

Hedge fund managers helped raise $1.7 million on Wednesday night to benefit iMentor, the New York City based mentoring nonprofit founded in 1999 by John Griffin of Blue Ridge Capital.

Supporters of the event from the hedge fund world included Chase Coleman of Tiger Global Management, Rick Gerson of Falcon Edge Capital, David Greenspan of Slate Path Capital, Roberto Mignone of Bridger Management and Richard Bello, Peter Daneker and Steven Marks of Blue Ridge.

Other supporters of the 300 person benefit dinner were Alex Ehrlich of Morgan Stanley's prime brokerage unit, John Lykouretzos of Hoplite Capital Management, Rafael Mayer of hedge fund firm Khronos, Talbott Simonds of Hillman family office affiliate Tondern Capital, Charles Anderson of Fox Point Capital, and Chris Hagstrom and Bill Richards of UBS. Richards, Mayer, Lykouretzos and Ehrlich are on iMentor's board of directors.

Griffin served as the master of ceremonies at the Mandarin Oriental in Manhattan, introducing actor Michael J. Fox, CBS anchor Gayle King and other audience members to past and present mentors and mentees.

iMentor matches underserved New York City high school students with mostly young-professional mentors to help them graduate high school and go to college. This year there are about 2,600 students in the program; thousands more are helped nationwide through iMentor Interactive, which supports other mentoring programs.

"We thank all attendees who came out for this special evening and made it so memorable," said iMentor's chief executive Mike O'Brien. "We hope you will join us this year as we provide more students from low-income communities with strong mentors dedicated to their success in high school, college, and beyond."