Dallas hedge funders go country for charity

By Lawrence Delevingne

Mon Dec 3, 2012


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Walker Smith, Highside, others don denim, taste TexMex at Capital for Kids benefit.


   
   Tim Lawler of Highland Capital (Photo: Capital for Kids)
The Dallas hedge fund set came out in force Thursday to benefit Capital for Kids, long a favorite charity among the city's industry elite.

The nonprofit's annual fundraiser at swank city venue Fashion Industry Gallery benefited 37 different charities, including Alliance for Children, Big Brothers, Big Sisters of North Texas, and Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Dallas. Capital for Kids has now raised $1.28 million this year.

The event drew an estimated 750 people, about 400 of whom came in from out of town, according to the organizers. Requested attire was "dressy denim" and the program featured a Texas country band, whiskey bar and TexMex hors d'oeuvres. A Polaris Ranger Crew all-terrain vehicle and a diamond and sapphire necklace were raffled; there was also a silent auction of such prizes as lessons at the Dallas Gun Club, a private box at a Texas Rangers game and tickets to the Dallas Symphony Orchestra.

Lead hedge fund sponsors for the event were WS Capital Management and Highside Capital Management; other large benefactors included Maverick Capital, Kleinheinz Capital Partners, Highland Capital Management, Carlson Capital, SAC Capital Advisors, Hayman Advisors, Whitebox Advisors and HBK Capital Management, among other financial services firms.

Capital for Kids' 2012 board includes Kyle Bass of Hayman, Clint Carlson of Carlson, Lee Hobson of Highside, G. Stacy Smith and Reid Walker of WS, Rusty Rose of Cardinal Investment Co., and Tim Lawler of Highland.

The organization was formed in 2003 as part of national group Hedge Funds Care. The co-founders, Akin Gump's Eliot Raffkind, Morgan Stanley's John Carlisle and WS's Walker, amicably broke off from HFC in 2005 to focus on local initiatives and have raised more than $8 million in the past seven years.

See also: Walker Smith to shut | Kyle Bass is betting on veterans