Bridgewater's Greg Jensen donates poker winnings to Sandy Hook Elementary victims

By Lawrence Delevingne

Fri Jan 18, 2013

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A poker novice, the firm's co-CIO entered a pro tournament--and nearly won.


 
  Greg Jensen (left) with Ray Dalio at Bridgewater. (Photo: Michael Edwards for AR)

Greg Jensen may be one of the world's top money managers--he's co-chief executive officer and a co-chief investment officer of $130 billion Bridgewater Associates--but he was a nobody in the world of poker...until now.

Jensen finished sixth at the 10th annual PokerStars.com Caribbean Adventure in the $100,000 Super High Roller division, winning $286,200.

The tournament, one of the largest in poker, was held in the Bahamas at the Atlantis Report and Casino from January 5 through 13. The Super High Roller event, which requires $100,000 to enter, featured 47 players. American poker professional Scott Seiver won, taking home slightly more than $2 million.

Jensen made it to the final table despite being a poker novice. "I'm just an amateur player and played a little bit when I was younger. I just play for fun," he told trade publication Bluff.com

According to the publication, Jensen gave the full winnings to victims of the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting. He did not immediately respond to a request for additional comment.

Jensen's wife, Valerie, also played in the tournament's Women's Event, finishing third. She also reportedly donated her $8,320 winnings to the Newton, Conn. cause. "We live near Newtown, and it's very important to me to help Newtown smile again. We're hopefully going to make them a carousel," she told Pokerstarsblog.com.

Jensen also noted the parallels between managing a hedge fund and poker. "There's a bit of similarity. I work a lot with probabilities and such. Being able to stay calm helps," he told Bluff.com.

According to the same story, Jensen said he entered the tournament after a colleague paid his $100,000 entry as a birthday present. "I just decided to play this because, what the hell?"

See also: Dalio joins the Gates-Buffett Giving Pledge | Michael Geismar's $710,000 blackjack breakfast